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Russia and Rwanda agreed to construct the first Centre of Nuclear Science and Technologies in Rwanda

Communications Department of ROSATOM, PUBLISHED 26.10.2019

Russia and Rwanda signed an agreement to construct the first Centre of Nuclear Science and Technologies in Rwanda with participation of ROSATOM.The signing ceremony took part at the Russia-Africa Economic Forum.

The agreement to construct Rwandas first Centre for Nuclear Science and Technology (CNST) was signed by ROSATOM Director General Alexey Likhachev, and Rwandas Minister of Infrastructure Claver Gatete.

The CNST will become a modern platform for carrying out a whole range of scientific research and practical application of nuclear technologies. It will allow the production of radioisotopes for widespread use in industry and agriculture as well as in healthcare, thus addressing the issue of lack of cancer treatment. Moreover, the Centre will facilitate the analysis of elemental composition of ore and minerals and environmental samples, train highly qualified local personnel for the nuclear industry, contribute to digital technologies research and many others.

The CNST is expected to comprise of a multi-purpose research water-cooled reactor with up to 10 MW capacity. It will be equipped with laboratories, systems and functional units necessary for safe operation.

Topics: Rosatom, Africa


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